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Lessons from Development Evaluations - 2013

What gets measured gets done.
If you don't measure results, you can't tell success from failure.
If you can't see success, you can't reward it.
If you can't reward success, you're probably rewarding failure.
If you can't see success, you can't learn from it. If you can't recognize failure, you can't correct it.
If you can demonstrate results, you can win public support.Footnote 1

Table of Contents

Introduction

Evaluation serves various purposes - accountability and learning, most notably. It is not only a requirement that we take the time to evaluate our projects and programs, it is good practice to do so as it allows us to gather lessons from the successes and challenges faced in implementing development activities.

About this report

This report draws out key lessons from project and program evaluations of various kinds (formative, mid-term, summative) related to the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD)'s development efforts completed between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2013. The report provides a summary of each of the projects or programs evaluated, including key findings from the evaluation.

Learning what works

Lessons drawn from evaluations can improve one's understanding of what constitutes good development - in particular, what works for whom, in what conditions and why. Key users include DFATD staff and partners who design and implement international development programs and projects. Incorporating these lessons, many of which are components of good project management, into future operations will also give Canadian taxpayers better value for their tax dollars.

What the report reviewed

A sample of 20 evaluations from among the 58 completed in FY 2012/13 was used for this report. In this sample, 17 covered bilateral programming, 2 multilateral programming and 1 DFATD's Partnerships for Development Innovation program. The most common themes addressed were governance (9 evaluations) and economic growth (6 evaluations); some evaluations made reference to both (5 evaluations).

This year's main lessons

The main lessons from this year's evaluations are the importance of:

  1. nurturing effective partnerships;
  2. supporting capacity development; and
  3. improving performance management.

1. Nurture effective partnerships: listen, coordinate, leverage and provide technical assistance to enhance effectiveness

Development initiatives face a multitude of challenges to success - this year's lessons from evaluations indicate that those projects that build mechanisms to listen, coordinate, leverage and engage strategically with multiple stakeholders are more effective.

Mechanisms to listen and coordinate

Projects in Afghanistan and in Burmese refugee camps created mechanisms to solicit individual concerns, even in difficult situations. These same mechanisms were also found to provide opportunities to consult with a range of groups, build capacity and develop broader social cohesion and trust.

The mid-term evaluation of the Afghanistan Community Renewal Program - Phase II (ACRP II) describes how the project used participatory community mechanisms, such as 'social audits', to allow for public oversight and analysis of Village Councils' decisions and use of funds. Similarly, the summative evaluation of the Enhancing Licit Livelihoods Opportunities in Northern Afghanistan (ELLONA) project showed how community-based savings groups enabled the development of community capacity, built social capital, and facilitated the management of quarrels.

The formative evaluation of Camp Management in the Burmese Refugee Camps in Thailand considered the camp management policies and practices to be a good example of comprehensive community-based refugee management; effective consultation and coordination mechanisms were provided to nine refugee camps and approximately 140,000 refugees in 2011. Camp management was overseen by three major stakeholder groups:

  1. refugees and camp service providers;
  2. the Thai Government; and
  3. donors, each requiring separate coordination. Camp-level coordination facilitated good information sharing, but has not always proven effective in program planning and priority setting. The evaluation highlighted the importance of a shared vision and mutual trust for effective camp management, and recommended instituting mechanisms, such as direct minority representation, minority advisory bodies, or a camp public forum, to ensure that the voices of ethnic and religious minorities, as well as youth and women, were heard and considered.
Clarifying roles and responsibilities for effective coordination

The Food Security, Sustainable Agricultural Development project (FASDEP) evaluation in Ghana explored the effectiveness of DFATD's budgetary assistance to the Government of Ghana, including technical assistance. The evaluation noted that, as a result of this technical assistance, coordination between civil society organizations improved; organizations mapped all food security initiatives in the north and participated in bi-monthly meetings to improve the coordination of these activities. At the same time, the evaluation recommended clarifying the roles of technical experts in order to maximise the use of their skills.

The Support to the Nicaragua Productive Rural Development Sector Program (PRORURAL) evaluation highlighted how overcoming challenges of inter-departmental and territorial coordination required senior management attention. These coordination challenges could have been avoided by institutionalizing coordination mechanisms, and clarifying roles and responsibilities of the organizations in an iterative manner.

Similarly, the evaluation of the Regional Human Rights and Peace Building Fund Project in the Middle East noted that success required coordination of action at different levels. For instance, the local provision of essential services to victims of abuse should be combined with national advocacy using specific cases as references for broader awareness.

Maximise strategic partnerships

The Capacity Building Technical Assistance Facility Project in South Africa consisted of two components:

  1. funded learning exchanges (primarily between South African civil society organizations and Canadian counterparts) to promote pro-poor service delivery and enhance transparency and accountability; and,
  2. targeted capacity building support to government in order to achieve timely, adequate, gender-sensitive, pro-poor service delivery. This second component provided support to the Technical Assistance Unit within the National Treasury to facilitate broader capacity development of public institutions. This strategic institutional support resulted in strengthened national government institutions and greater local capacity to address public administration issues over the longer-term. The project evaluation hailed this as a positive example of complementary strategic and grass roots interventions.
Leverage complementary initiatives

Several evaluations noted the importance of linking diverse stakeholders to ensure success. The Partnerships with Canadians Governance Program evaluation noted that successful projects involved mature partnerships with mutually agreed outcomes, a focus on a specific area or level of government, and diverse stakeholder involvement. Non-governmental organizations were able to act as catalysts in this process by linking different levels of government while understanding local realities. This evaluation recommended that, where appropriate, small projects or 'downstream' initiatives in communities or with local governments are linked 'upstream' to national governments in order to amplify results.

The ELLONA project in Afghanistan embarked on a cost-sharing exercise with cooperatives to establish a potato cold storage facility, the key investment required to deliver the agricultural product to a wider market.

In Pakistan, the Pathways and Purse-strings project evaluation noted the critical importance of producer groups as a way of linking small amounts of produce to their larger markets, as well as to stimulate producers to improve product quality, improve alignment with market forces, and provide products on a timelier basis in order to fetch higher prices. In addition, the evaluation found that buyers were able to better relate to the producer groups, resulting in a win-win situation.

The PRORURAL project evaluation in Nicaragua flagged the importance of a partnership between multiple stakeholders to achieve growth across the agricultural sector and reduce poverty. These partnerships included the private sector, non-governmental organizations, local government, financial and commercial agents, and agribusinesses.

Consult the right experts

It is often necessary to recognise limitations and solicit external support. For instance, the PELNICA Nicaragua Rural Electrification project was designed to include technical assistance for the Government of Nicaragua - specifically, to support rural electrification and small business development. Despite various successes, the project was not able to establish a microfinance organization; the evaluation recommended that an external expert be consulted to address this particular challenge.

The Caribbean regional program evaluation recommended increasing the use of professional resources in the field to better identify strategic opportunities and integrate environmental sustainability as a cross-cutting theme.

2. Support capacity development: dynamic, participatory approaches have proven success

Several lessons from the evaluation reports focus on capacity building efforts. They highlight different elements of capacity, including the manner in which social structures can help to develop capacity and allow communities to work and learn together.

The ELLONA project evaluation noted that capacity building is a process that, unlike infrastructure building projects, lacks fixed "start-finish" boundaries. "Capacity" means that "there are processes in place through which individuals (men, women, girls and boys), organizations (institutions, governments, etc.) and societies can obtain, strengthen and maintain resources and competencies to set and achieve their own development objectives."Footnote 2 As such, capacity building is often a dynamic, iterative and multidimensional process.

The results of successful capacity building are described in the evaluation of the Pathways and Purse-strings project in Pakistan: improved market access and production techniques; higher prices for products; and, most importantly, significant increases in income. In this project, the implementing agency supported capacity development at all levels of the value chain - among suppliers, producers and buyers.

The project used a broad range of capacity development approaches, all in an interactive and participatory manner, which allowed project implementers and beneficiaries to overcome 'stumbling blocks'.

The approach taken in Phase II of the Afghanistan Community Renewal Program provided training to Community Development Council members on leadership, conflict resolution, common property resource management and gender sensitivity, which provided Councils with the necessary skills to successfully define and implement village development plans. In addition, the Farmer Field Schools component of the same project delivered intensive, practical, well-structured and technically advanced training on a wide spectrum of topics, such as livestock, horticulture, cash crops, and integrated crop management.

The evaluation of the Local Governance Support for Local Economic Development project in the Philippines noted mixed results on capacity development efforts; educational workshops and forums that permitted participants to share and learn from each other's experiences were rated well, while other formal training, in spite of high-quality trainers and training material, was considered too lengthy, inflexible and too classroom-focused.

3. Improve performance management to enhance the achievement of results

The lessons from the evaluation reports sampled speak to the importance of integrating performance management, including measurable indicators, into project implementation. This is a particular challenge in governance and human rights interventions, where, unlike economic growth for instance, it is more difficult to find and agree on measurable indicators.

Integrate performance management into project implementation

Results-based management (RBM), used by DFATD Development for decades, is a life-cycle approach to management focused on achieving outcomes, implementing performance measurement, learning, adapting, and reporting on performance. DFATD's tools include logic models, performance measurement frameworks and risk registers.

The evaluation of the Local Governance Support for Local Economic Development project in the Philippines noted that while RBM tools are appropriate, their complexity and detail renders them difficult for some partners and clients to use. The evaluation report suggested appointing an external monitor for the project to provide timely advice as the project or program takes shape. Ideally, this would occur during the preparation or submission of the program implementation plan.

The PRORURAL evaluation recommended that monitoring feed into day-to-day activities, with a participatory system that shares implementation responsibility and allows feedback from partners to influence performance.

Anticipate and manage risks

Although a possible change in the political landscape of Mali was identified as a program risk, Canada did not predict the extent of political change that took place in 2012.

The evaluation suggested that regular updates to the program risk analysis would be required. It's also noted that low cost, post-project support can help sustain the results of an investment, especially in high-risk environments.

The Colombia country program evaluation considered risk in the context of community members' vulnerability and the importance of the "do no harm" principle (for effective engagement in fragile states) to ensure that development efforts did not place beneficiaries at risk.

Defining targets and measures clearly

The mid-term review of the Canada Investment Fund for Africa concluded that the Fund achieved its objectives and was both a catalytic and innovative public-private equity fund. However, the review was not able to measure the Fund's performance in the absence of appropriate benchmarks; only anecdotal information was available on the achievement of development outcomes.

The review noted that the Fund was designed to operate independently, an approach that limited the Government of Canada's exposure to risks and was effective in leveraging third-party investors. For future agreements, the review suggested a clearer articulation of expected results, definition of related performance indicators, specification of data collection mechanisms, and inclusion of contractual provisions for ongoing financial oversight.

Governance and capacity development projects face challenges in effectively identifying and tracking relevant indicators. For instance, the evaluation of the Regional Mechanisms to Protect the Human Rights of Women and Girls in Southeast Asia described the challenges faced in effectively tracking changes in attitudes and behaviour regarding human rights.

DFATD's governance toolkit provides relevant resources, including outcomes and indicators. International partners also provide resources, such as the United Nations Development Programme's discussion paper on measuring democracy and democratic governance interventions, and the Inter-American Development Bank's interactive governance indicators database.

The World Bank Institute's Capacity Development and Results framework provides a strategic and results-oriented approach to learning for capacity development.

Annex: Evaluation Highlights

Corporate EvaluationsFootnote 3

Geographic Branches

Global Issues and Development Branch

Partnership for Development Innovation Branch

Evaluations led by Program Branches

Geographic Branches

Country Program Evaluation: Mali - 2006-2011

Evaluation Type: Country Program Evaluation

Country: Mali

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $486,500,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Econotec

Scope: 2006-2011

The Mali Country Program disbursed $486.5 million between 2006 and 2011 to help alleviate poverty and promote development in Mali, one of the world's poorest countries. The program placed particular emphasis on children and youth, economic development, and public sector reform.

Why conduct this evaluation?

The purpose of this evaluation was to assess results and management performance, and to document lessons learned.

What did the evaluation find?

Effectiveness: Long-term investments in education, health, and food security achieved good results in addressing the root causes of poverty. In education, the program increased the number of textbooks available in schools, and through local procurement, developed a Malian textbook industry. It also facilitated the decentralization process of Mali's education sector.

Relevance: The program supported the Government of Mali in meeting its commitments to promote redistributive growth and poverty reduction by boosting productive sectors and consolidating public sector reforms. The program also reflected Government of Canada priorities and maintained a focus on key long-term themes.

Sustainability: Long-term engagement allowed time for development gains to mature. At the same time, more robust risk analysis could have strengthened sustainability planning.

Gender equality and environmental sustainability: The program achieved progress in gender equality mainly through policy dialogue, but paid less attention to matters of environmental sustainability.

Coherence: There was excellent coordination of aid-delivery mechanisms with other donors and the Government of Mali. One challenge was to ensure effective collaboration among Canadian and local partners in the field.

Efficiency: There was an improved balance between management costs and investments from the last evaluation period (2000-2005). The program has one of the lowest ratios of field staff to total disbursements.

Performance management: The application of results-based management and risk-analysis tools improved over the review period.

What is next for the Mali program?

There is an opportunity to improve the program's performance by:

Country Program Evaluation: Colombia - 2006-2011

Evaluation Type: Country Program Evaluation

Country: Colombia

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $65,000,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Plan: Net Ltd.

Scope: 2006-2011

The Colombia Country Program disbursed nearly $65 million from 2006 to 2011. There was a strong focus on children's rights, civilian protection, peacebuilding, sustainable economic growth and private sector development, and food security. By 2011 the program had focused its programming in the conflict-affected department (province) of Nariño.

Why conduct this evaluation?

This evaluation was intended to assess results and management performance, and to document lessons learned.

What did the evaluation find?

Effectiveness: Among other results of the program, the Government of Colombia created policies to entrench child human rights protection and fostered youth-led peacebuilding. The department of Tolima passed legislation to eliminate the worst forms of child labour.

Relevance: The program's highly relevant initiatives for the socially vulnerable-in particular children's rights, access to early childhood education, and prevention of youth involvement in violent and illicit activities-reflected real needs in this conflict-affected country.

Sustainability: The program designed and implemented projects that Colombians can sustain in the long term. Although many donors have announced reductions in funding, Canada's designation of Colombia as a country of focus has led to predictable funding.

Crosscutting themes: Mixed results in addressing gender equality and environmental sustainability indicate a need for improvements on the part of the program and partners.

Coherence: There was strong alignment with Canadian foreign policy priorities. The program also played a leadership role in donor coordination, particularly in human rights programming.

Efficiency: The focus on a key strategic issue-child rights-maximized impact. Using local organizations to implement projects proved cost effective.

Management principles: Ownership by the Government of Colombia and donor harmonization have significantly improved.

Performance management: There was consistency and leadership in the use of results-based management and risk analyses. Better baselines, gender-disaggregated data, and clear targets for selected indicators would further improve reporting.

What is next for the Colombia Country Program?

Regional Program Evaluation: Caribbean - 2006-2011

Evaluation Type: Regional Program Evaluation

Region: The Caribbean

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Results Based Management Group

Scope: 2006-2011

The Caribbean Program covers 11 island states (Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Trinidad and Tobago) and 3 continental ones (Belize, Guyana, and Suriname). Canada is a major contributor of official development assistance to the region.

Why conduct this evaluation?

The evaluation was conducted to assess the Caribbean Program's performance and results in 2006-2011, during which disbursements totalled $194.7 million.

What did the evaluation find?

Effectiveness: The program achieved valuable results in terms of capacity development. The use of country-specific programming in the earlier part of the evaluation period, in addition to regional projects, contributed to strengthened country capacity for participation in regional activities.

Relevance: There was a good correlation, among many of the projects, with regional and country needs. There were common strands and a progressively narrower focus on trade, economic activities, and vocational training over the five-year period.

Sustainability: Where the program worked with regional institutions and partnerships, sustainability increased because these relationships remained even when there was staff turnover.

Gender equality and environmental sustainability: Performance on gender equality as a crosscutting theme was mixed, and environmental sustainability was not effectively pursued.

Coherence: Policy dialogue was reasonably effective in some instances, but there is room for improvement. Caribbean officials responsible for aid coordination at the national and regional levels are less aware of substantial Canadian interventions.

Efficiency: Changes in the programming strategy, the decentralization of the program, and the introduction of new reporting mechanisms at the corporate level affected efficiency.

Management Principles: There are good examples of donor coordination and consistency with aid effectiveness principles.

Performance management: Program staff would benefit from increased support on the application, at the corporate level, of new monitoring and reporting tools to improve results management.

What is next for the Caribbean program?

Canadian Investment Fund for Africa (CIFA) - 2005-2008

Evaluation Type: Midterm Review

Region: Africa

Project Duration: 2005-2013

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $70,234,795

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) amalgamated since June 2013 to form DFATD)

Consultant: This Midterm Review was conducted jointly by the former CIDA and former DFAIT's evaluation services

Date: March 2012

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

The purpose of this mid-term review was to provide independent and evidence-based information on the relevance, performance (i.e., effectiveness and efficiency), and the design and delivery of the CIFA initiative. It was also intended to provide lessons learned regarding the appropriateness of the CIFA model. The findings would also be useful to other Government of Canada departments and agencies and key stakeholders, such as CIFA Fund Managers, Actis LLP (United Kingdom) and Cordiant Capital Inc. (Montreal).

The program was designed to run between June 2005 and December 2013 with the possibility of extension for up to 2 years.

Intervention Description

The Canada Investment Fund for Africa is a Government of Canada initiative created to provide risk capital for investment in Africa; as such, it is an important component of Canada's contribution to private sector development in Africa. The Government of Canada investment of $100 million has leveraged an additional $160 million for investments in fifteen individual African companies in the oil and gas, mining, consumer goods, financial services, agribusiness, manufacturing, and logistics sectors, as well as two regional equity funds targeting small and medium-sized enterprises.

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

The CIFA Fund Managers are Actis LLP (United Kingdom) and Cordiant Capital Inc. (Montreal). Other stakeholders include the Government of Canada, private sector investors, and beneficiaries in Africa.

Key Findings

Key Recommendations

A Review of Program Evaluation Reporting: African Development Bank - 2007-2012

Evaluation Type: Development Effectiveness Review

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Universalia Management Group

Scope: 2007-2012

The African Development Bank (AfDB) contributes to the sustainable economic development and social progress of African countries. It provides development assistance to regional member countries in the form of financial instruments, policy advice, and technical assistance through the public and private sectors.

Why conduct this evaluation?

The original purpose of the review was to provide an independent assessment of the development effectiveness of the AfDB, building from the AfDB's own body of evaluative evidence. However, a preliminary assessment of the AfDB's evaluations for the period 2007-2012 noted weaknesses in program-level evaluations. The review therefore focused on presenting recommendations that would support the AfDB's ongoing efforts to strengthen its evaluation function.

What did the review find?

What is next for DFATD and the AfDB?

Development Effectiveness Review of the Asian Development Bank - 2006-2010

Evaluation Type: Development Effectiveness Review

Region: Asia

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Goss Gilroy Inc.

Scope: 2006-2010

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) is a major source of development financing for countries in Asia and the Pacific. Headquartered in Manila, ADB had, in 2011, US$21.7 billion in financing and 2,958 employees from 59 countries. Its mandate is to reduce poverty and to improve the lives of the poor in the region by fostering economic growth and regional cooperation.

Why conduct this evaluation?

This review provides an independent, evidence-based assessment of ADB's development effectiveness with a view to guiding Canada's future engagement with ADB and sharing with stakeholders. The review assessed 45 ADB evaluations conducted by its Independent Evaluation Department (IED) between 2006 and 2010.

What did the review find?

Relevance: ADB programs were relevant to the needs of the target groups and developing-country governments. However, a more robust analysis of the needs of target groups would improve the suitability of some program components.

Performance: Most ADB programs achieved their objectives and expected results thanks to the high level of program ownership by national governments and the high performance of most government and non-government partners.

Sustainability: The long-term sustainability of ADB programming results requires improvement, particularly through increased investment in the operation and maintenance of infrastructure.

Efficiency: Delays in program start-up and implementation contributed, in some cases, to increased costs.

Gender equality: ADB needs to ensure that more evaluation reports deal with this important issue. In evaluations that discussed gender equality, 75% of ADB programs effectively addressed it.

Environmental sustainability: Most ADB programs supported environmental sustainability effectively but they could benefit from investing in program elements designed to mitigate negative environmental impacts.

Monitoring and evaluation systems: ADB's independent evaluation systems were strong and the bank used them effectively. However, local systems for monitoring and reporting results need strengthening.

What is next for CIDA?

Partnerships with Canadians Program Evaluation: Governance - 2008-2012

Evaluation Type: Program Evaluation

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $170,000,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Results Based Management Group

Scope: 2008-2012

Why conduct this evaluation?

The purpose of this evaluation was to examine the results achieved by the Partnerships with Canadians Governance Program from 2008 to 2012 and provide recommendations to improve its performance. The evaluation looked at 77 governance projects conducted with Canadian partner organizations in 81 countries around the world, covering $170 million in spending. The program is aimed at advancing Canada's commitment to freedom, human rights and the rule of law.

What did the evaluation find?

Effectiveness: Canada's partners demonstrated positive achievements in building accountable public institutions and promoting freedom and democracy. There are mixed results in the area of human rights programming, and limited programming exists on the rule of law.

Relevance: The Governance Program addresses needs identified by local organizations. Canadian organizations generally have strong and trusting relationships with local partners.

Sustainability: Improving governance is a long-term challenge requiring sustained investments to achieve results. Most governance projects lack information on sustainability considerations and plans for when funding agreements will end.

Gender Equality: Projects that paid more attention to local needs and context displayed greater success in promoting gender equality. However, many governance projects did not sufficiently integrate gender equality into planning and management.

Coherence: Most Canadian partners do not coordinate their governance activities with other Canadian organizations, although some examples exist. Coordination between Canadian organizations could add substantial value to work in this area.

Performance Management: Canadian partners make good use of performance-management tools to inform decision-making.

What is next for the program?

Pathways and Pursestrings: Enhancing Market Access for Women Producers in Pakistan - 2007-2012

Evaluation Type: End-of-Project Evaluation

Country: Pakistan

Project Duration: 2007-2013

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $6,920,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultants: Geospatial/SALASAN Consulting Inc.

Date: August 2012

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

This evaluation examined the results that the project has achieved related to three specific areas: production capacity, improved access to market and the strengthened capacity of networked Key Facilitating Partners in terms of effectiveness, efficiency, relevance and sustainability criteria. Furthermore, it also assessed the project's performance in terms of local ownership and mutual accountability, its harmonization with other development efforts at the local level, and gender equality.

The evaluation relied on a document review, key informants interviews in Canada and Parkistan, and site visits in Pakistan.

Intervention Description

The goal of this project is to empower women in hard-to-reach rural areas, increase their household incomes, and build the capacity of Pakistani institutions to facilitate women's access to viable markets with appropriate products.

The project aims to provide homebound and isolated rural women with sustainable market linkages, product information, quality control, skills development, improved market supplies, and other support that enables them to access growing and dynamic markets with the products demanded by contemporary consumers.

To achieve the above, the Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA) works with Pakistani civil society organizations and district governments that are already working on income generation with poor rural women producers, to develop their capacity to undertake successful market development programming. MEDA expects to provide technical assistance and training on collaborative value chain analysis and program design to ensure sustainable market development approaches that effectively integrate women and provide them with a fair return on their labour.

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

The project took place in the provinces of Sindh, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Balochistan, and was executed by the Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA). The lead Pakistani partner has been the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Institute, with support of four key facilitating partners: Pakistan Social Welfare Society, Haleeb Foods Limited, Kaarvan Craft Foundation, Sarhad Rural Support Program.

Key Conclusions

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Enhancing Licit Livelihoods Opportunities in Northern Afghanistan (ELLONA) - 2009-2012

Evaluation Type: Summative Evaluation

Country: Afghanistan

Project Duration: 2009-2012

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $22,700,000

Commissioned by: Afghanistan Program, Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultants: Dale Posgate, Fulcrum Consultants and Geospatial/SALASAN Consulting Inc.

Date: August 2012

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

The evaluation's main objective was to examine the project's relevance, effectiveness, efficiency and sustainability. It measures ELLONA's achievements against the project's planned outcomes, based upon field research, and the project's Logic Model. The evaluation relied on project documents and interviews with stakeholders, project staff and beneficiaries.

Intervention Description

The purpose of this project is to improve the socio-economic status of more than one million people in the provinces of Badakhshan and Takhar by increasing licit livelihoods opportunities and promoting good governance. The project seeks to increase the range of licit income-generating opportunities available to women and men by introducing and encouraging widespread use of improved agricultural practices and by creating an environment that supports the establishment and growth of small and medium-sized enterprises. The project also seeks to strengthen the ability of community organizations as well as local and district-level government to deliver services and support sustainable development initiatives.

While the project focuses on north-eastern Afghanistan, it also aims to provide basic skills training for community organizations and local governments in southern Afghanistan, including Kandahar. ELLONA operated from 2009-2012, with a budget of $22.7 million.

Intervention Sectors

Human and Institutional Development:

Agricultural Development and Natural Resource Management:

Partners and Stakeholders

The Aga-Khan Foundation Afghanistan implemented the project. Sub-national governance bodies such as Community Development Councils, Cluster Level Development Councils, District Development Assemblies, and local non-governmental organizations and Community Based Savings Groups were involved in capacity building activities and received technical assistance in some cases.

Key Conclusions

Results in all three of ELLONA's sectors of intervention (components) corresponded with the project's planned immediate outcomes and some of the planned intermediate or end-of-project outcomes. Measuring the project's longer term effect in promoting "sustainable improvements in the socio-economic position of people and communities in north-eastern Afghanistan" is beyond the scope of the present evaluation.

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations listed above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Support to Ghana's Food and Agricultural Sector Development Policy (S-FASDEP) - 2009-2012

Evaluation Type: Mid-term Assessment Report

Country: Ghana

Project Duration: 2009-2014

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $110,000,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: The Cess Institute

Date: July 2012

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

DFATD, (formerly CIDA) has provided sector budget support to the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA) since 2004. DFATD's first sector budget support programme covered 2004-08 (entitled Food and Agricultural Budget Support or FABS), valued at $85 M followed by a bridging year, 2009, worth $20M. The second budget support programme, valued at $110M covers the period 2009-13. As a means to ensure that its current and future investments and interventions are coherent and consistent, DFATD contracted an external evaluator to assess Canada's support to MoFA in 2012. This mid-term assessment was intended to evaluate the results, effectiveness and efficiency of budget support thus far while providing guidance on how to more effectively implement support programs within the agricultural sector.

This report provides a detailed assessment of sector-specific results achieved, implementation of budget support programs, institutional development results, effectiveness of budget support programs, and provides key recommendations and lessons learned.

The assessment relies on document review and interviews with key partners and stakeholders.

Intervention Description

This program is the second component of the Ghana Growth and Poverty Reduction Support Program. Through this component, Canada is providing sector budget support to the Government of Ghana to enhance its efforts in promoting sustainable rural development through food and agriculture As with all budget support initiatives, Canada is working in close cooperation with other donors and the Government of Ghana to strengthen aid effectiveness, by focussing on effective, transparent, and accountable country systems; increasing donor coordination and harmonization; and strengthening mutual accountability. Budgetary support also fosters greater policy dialogue between the Canadian government, the Ghanaian government, and partners, thus helping to strengthen efforts for effective, focused aid, as well as long-term development results. This initiative is continuously monitored and evaluated in coordination with other donors.

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

MoFA is the government body responsible for the overall development of agriculture in Ghana and has been the main partner for this program. MoFEP, the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning, now called the Ministry of Finance, has also been deeply involved. The Agriculture Sector Working Group (ASWG), which includes other development partners, other Government of Ghana departments, private sector and civil society organizations have also been involved.

Key Findings

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations listed above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada, nor the Government of Ghana. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Productive Rural Development Sector Program (PRORURAL Incluyente) - 2010-2012

Evaluation Type: Mid-term Evaluation

Country: Nicaragua

Project Duration: 2010-2014

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $8,110,000

Commissioned by: Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Government of Nicaragua

Consultant: Richard Anson

Date: October 2012

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

The evaluation aimed to support the effective management of the Productive Rural Development Sector Program in achieving its outcome-level objectives targeted for late 2014.

The evaluation assessed alignment with national policies, the contribution of results to three related national programs, and the management systems and institutional capacity for program implementation.

The evaluation relied on a document review, including analysis of the program's logic model, key informant interviews, and participatory workshops. Consulting decision makers, technical staff, program beneficiaries, donors and other private sector actors such as cooperatives, the evaluation provided a broad perspective of the program at the national and local levels.

Intervention Description

This project contributes to strengthening the agriculture sector in Nicaragua. It helps the Government of Nicaragua implement its Productive Rural Development Sector Program (known by its Spanish acronym PRORURAL). The goal of PRORURAL is to increase sustainable economic growth in rural areas and increase access to safe, nutritious food for poor rural women and men. PRORURAL helps farmers to increase their productivity and the quality of the food they produce; helps them to diversify their crops and transform their produce into higher-value products; and promotes sustainable use of forestry resources and improved management of the forestry sector.

As with all sector support initiatives, Canada is working in close cooperation with other donors and the Government of Nicaragua to promote effective, transparent, and accountable country systems; increase donor coordination and harmonization; and strengthen mutual accountability. This initiative is continuously monitored and evaluated in coordination with other donors.

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

Target beneficiaries include rural families and agricultural producers, as well as citizens participating to reduce deforestation.

The institutions implementing PRORURAL are the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAGFOR), the Nicaraguan Agricultural Technology Institute (INTA), the Ministry of Family, Community, Cooperative and Associative Economy (MEFCCA) and the National Forestry Institute (INAFOR). MAGFOR is the lead organization responsible for the program within the government.

International donors include Austria, Finland, Norway, Spain and Switzerland as well as Canada.

Key Conclusions

The evaluation noted significant achievements, including:

Major challenges that remain include:

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Nicaragua Electrification Project (PELNICA) - 2009-2012

Evaluation Type: Mid-term Evaluation

Country: Nicaragua

Project Duration: 2009-2014

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $18,950,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Econotec Inc.

Date: January 2013

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

The purpose of the evaluation was to determine if the project is on target for achieving expected outcomes. The evaluation was also undertaken for learning purposes.

The evaluation examined results and assessed the effectiveness, efficiency and relevance of the project. It also drew lessons for future design and implementation of an anticipated subsequent phase.

The evaluation relied on a document review, key informant interviews in Canada and Managua, and data collection in representative samples of electrified communities in the project's region. Focus groups and interviews focused on four result areas: development of the Synergy Network, Gender Equality, creation/ development of MSMEs and user satisfaction.

Intervention Description

This project aims to provide access to electricity for approximately 102,000 individuals in over 650 communities, thereby increasing their quality of life and improving their economic opportunities. The project helps communities in going ahead with productive activities that are possible due to having access to electricity.

The project is implemented by the Government of Nicaragua's Ministry of Energy and Mines, the electrification arm of the Ministry having acquired the needed skills through earlier CIDA projects. The Ministry has been given the mandate to efficiently manage funds to universalize access to electricity in Nicaragua. The Government of Nicaragua gives priority to projects that promote economic development, reduce poverty, and protect the environment.

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

The government of Nicaragua's Ministry of Energy and Mines (MEM) identified communities to be electrified, based on socio-economic and geographic criteria, purchased materials and was responsible for construction, supervision, and provision of administrative and logistical support services. MEM-FODIEN (Fondo para el Desarrollo de la Industria Eléctrica Nacional) is the ministry's unit responsible for rural electrification. DISNORTE (the electricity distributor for the North of Nicaragua) was contracted by MEM to carry out electrification works. DISNORTE subcontracted construction companies. Starting with the second part of the 2011-2012 yearly program, ENATREL (Empresa Nacional de Transmisión Eléctrica) has been contracted to carry out the works for the rest of the project.

Key Conclusions

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Local Governance Support Program for Local Economic Development in the Philippines - 2008-2012

Evaluation Type: Mid-term Evaluation

Country: Philippines

Project Duration: 2006-2016

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $18,000,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Lucia Frick and Dr. Eddie Dorotan

Date: November 2012

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

The Mid-Term Assessment has the following objectives:

Intervention Description

The program supports national agencies in developing and improving policies, laws, programs, and activities in order to enhance local governance and economic development and strengthen relevant coordinating mechanisms (horizontal and vertical) at the national level. In addition, it supports the strengthening of umbrella organizations of local government units (LGUs) (e.g., alliances of provinces, cities, and municipalities) in order to increase their capacity to advocate for national-level measures to create an enabling environment for LGUs. The program also aims to strengthen the capacity of LGUs to improve the local business climate for increased investments, and to formulate and monitor policies for local economic development. The program supports the meaningful participation of civil society and the private sector in local development processes and strengthens resource generation and management capacities of LGUs. To improve conditions for local economic development, it also supports the strengthening of LGU/private sector/civil society partnerships and the development of supportive policies, incentives, and regulatory frameworks, and it helps to increase transparency and fairness in government systems and processes.

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

LGSD-LED is implemented by a consortium of the Canadian Urban Institute (CUI) and the Association of Canadian Community Colleges acting as the Canadian Executing Agency. The Canadian Executing Agency is working in partnership with the Philippine Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG). At the local level, LGSP-LED aims to build the capacity of Local Government Units/Alliances to develop innovative LED strategies that can produce important job creation and economic results.

Key Conclusions

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations listed above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Evaluation of Support to Establish the ASEAN Commission on Women and Children - 2010-2011

Evaluation Type: Mid-term Review Report Country: Member countries of ASEAN Project Duration: 2010-2014

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $2,950,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013) and UN Women

Consultant: Helen T. Thomas and Yumiko Kanemitsu, UN Women Regional Evaluation Specialist for Asia and the Pacific

Date: June 2012

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

This mid-term review sought to assess progress made on planned results and to validate the appropriateness of the Performance Monitoring Framework (PMF).

The review explored achievement of results against indicators, relevance of results and appropriateness of methodology, cost-effectiveness of results, sustainability, partnership, appropriateness of resource utilization, informed and timely action, visibility of the project and lessons learned.

These issues are assessed with the objective of contributing to better-informed decision making and fostering an environment of learning.

The evaluation relied on document review and independent information sources, interviews with stakeholders and personnel in the field, questionnaires, and field visits to Thailand, Indonesia, and Cambodia.

Intervention Description

The project aims to ensure better protection of women's and children's rights in member countries of the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) through effective human rights mechanisms such as the ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission for Human Rights and the ASEAN Commission on Women and Children. The project develops the institutional capacity, functions, and structures of both Commissions. At the same time, it enhances the capacity of organizations and networks in the ASEAN region that interact with these two Commissions and that have a critical role in ensuring they both fulfil their mandates to promote gender equality and protect women's and children's rights.

Activities include: supporting civil society dialogues with the ASEAN committees and other relevant bodies; undertaking a study on the use and the impact of existing regional mechanisms on the promotion and protection of women's rights; and supporting the consultative workshops of relevant ASEAN bodies on the terms of reference of the ASEAN human rights commissions.

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

Members of the ASEAN Human Rights bodies ACWC and the AIHCR benefited directly. Representatives from civil society organizations and National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) in the ASEAN regions also participated in policy dialogue.

Key Conclusions

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations listed above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Burma Border Assistance Program: Building Social Capital - 2010-2011

Evaluation Type: Formative EvaluationFootnote 7

Country: Thailand

Project Duration: 2010-2015

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $15,995,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013), Australian Agency for International Development and Act for Peace

Consultant: E.T. Jackson and Associates Ltd.

Date: September 2012

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

The purposes of this joint formative evaluation were to facilitate a constructive dialogue among stakeholders on the issue of camp management in refugee camps situated on the Thai-Burma border, describe the current camp management model that is in place, and identify areas where improvements and changes should be initiated.

It also assessed the effectiveness of the coverage of its responsibilities, the extent to which the work of the management structures in compliance with international standards, and fostered dialogue between partners about the model, based on documented evidence.

In addition to document review and key-person interviews, data was collected in the nine camps through a series of workshops and focus groups with a large sample of randomly selected refugees, including discussion groups for minorities, women and youth. In total, 1,060 stakeholders were engaged.

The main value of undertaking a joint evaluation with AusAID and Act for Peace lie in the amplified weight its recommendations carried among stakeholders.

Intervention Description

This project, implemented by Inter Pares, contributes to the development of civil society organizations and to building their capacity to identify needs, deliver services, and promote the interests of vulnerable and displaced people. An emphasis is placed on the participation of ethnic nationalities and women. Activities include: providing humanitarian assistance to Burmese refugees living in refugee camps in Thailand; the delivery of basic primary health care (including maternal and child health care) to displaced people in Burma's border areas; and civil society research, advocacy, and capacity-building on the issues of gender and violence against women, environmental degradation, forced displacement, human rights, drug abuse, and independent media.

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

The evaluated component of the project supports the Border Consortium (TBC), an organization based in Thailand. Stakeholders include the Royal Thai Government, Refugee Committees, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the International Rescue Committee, the Committee for the Coordination of Services to Displaced Persons in Thailand, and the Donor Humanitarian Actors Working Group. The project was implemented by Inter Pares.

Key Conclusions

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations listed above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Capacity Building Technical Assistance Facility Project (Component Two: Technical Assistance Unit) - 2007-2013

Evaluation Type: Final Evaluation

Country: South Africa

Project Duration: 2007-2014

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $15,900,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Stanley Mutisi Mthethwa and Daniel Chiwandamira

Date: April 2013

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

The evaluation investigated the extent to which the Capacity Building Technical Assistance Facility Project (Component Two) was executed efficiently and effectively and whether the stated results were achieved, using evaluation criteria including effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability, appropriateness of design, impact, and lessons learned.

The evaluation relied on interviews, focus group discussions, and review of sub-project documentation. Additionally, case studies for impact analysis were developed following site visits.

Intervention Description

The Capacity Building Technical Assistance Fund (CBTAF) supports South African initiatives to improve governance. More specifically, it helps build accountable public institutions and improve the capacity of government departments to deliver services.

The goal of this project was to contribute to improved service delivery, particularly for poor and vulnerable populations in South Africa in support of the South African Government's Program of Action. The project provided direct support to the Technical Assistance Unit of the South African National Treasury. The mandate of the Technical Assistance Unit is to improve the sustainable management of public finances through the provision of technical assistance and management support to other government departments (national, provincial and local).

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

Major stakeholders include International Development Cooperation at the National Treasury, the Department of Public Service and Administration, Public Administration Leadership and Management Academy and the Technical Assistance Unit as well as other national, provincial and local government departments.

Key Conclusions

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations listed above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Ukraine Horticulture Development Project - 2008-2013

Evaluation Type: End-of-Project Evaluation

Country: Ukraine

Project Duration: 2008-2013

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $10,250,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Date: March 2013

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

This evaluation assesses progress to date of the Ukraine Horticulture Development project and provides recommendations on the design of a new phase of the project.

The evaluation assesses the effectiveness, efficiency, relevance and sustainability of the project's interventions in the horticulture sector, and provides conclusions and recommendations to draw out lessons for a potential future phase of the project.

The evaluation relied on interviews with key informants, as well as project documents and reports.

Intervention Description

This project aims to strengthen the capacity of 5,000 smallholder farmers in the regions of Crimea and Zaporizhzhia to engage profitably, competitively, and sustainably in the production, processing, and marketing of high-value horticulture commodities. Farmers in these two regions face a range of constraints that inhibit their access to markets and lead to a significant percentage of the population living in poverty. The project involves partnering with lead farmers, local farmer associations and agriculture extension services to deliver technical training and other agriculture support services designed to improve production and facilitate access to markets for smallholder farmers.

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

The project is being implemented by Canadian partners, the Mennonite Economic Development Associates and Ukrainian partners, the Association of Farmers and Land Owners in Crimea (AFLOC) and Agro-Tavria, a nonprofit organization providing extension services in the Zaporizhzhia Oblast.

Key Conclusions

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations listed above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Regional Human Rights and Peacebuilding Fund (RHRPF) Project - 2007-2012

Evaluation Type: End-of-Project Evaluation

Country: Iraq, Lebanon, the West Bank, Morocco, Tunisia and Jordan

Project Duration: 2007-2013

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $4,949,240

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Interalia

Date: July 2012

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

The objective of this End-of-Project Assessment was to ascertain progress and results of the Regional Human Rights Peacebuilding Fund in the Middle East and North Africa region as well as its overall performance.

The assessment focused on three main points:

  1. Development Results;
  2. Quality of Partnership; and
  3. Success Factors.

The Assessment also identified some lessons learned and suggested a few recommendations to improve the project.

The assessment also looked at the following issues: the quality of designs and partnership, some best practices, appropriateness of resource utilizations, risk management, etc.

The evaluation relied on a questionnaire administered to civil society organizations, a field mission, interviews with key stakeholders, and extensive document review.

Intervention Description

This $5 M fund aims to help establish an environment for peace and stability that is rooted in the values of the Middle East and that respects the international principles and standards for human rights, including the rights of women. CIDA's contribution provides support to selected local and regional non-governmental organizations to implement projects which contribute to reducing human rights abuses and increasing women's influence on promoting human rights and peace building.

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

Initially, the Fund was to operate in Iraq, Lebanon and WestBank. The events of the "Arab Spring" (2011), prompted CIDA Representatives to widen the geographic scope of the project to include sub-projects from Morocco, Tunisia and the Project Management Unit is based in Amman, Jordan. The project focused on collaboration with selected civil society organizations in the region.

Key Conclusions

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations listed above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Afghanistan Community Renewal Program - II - 2009-2012

Evaluation Type: Mid-term Evaluation

Country: Afghanistan

Project Duration: 2009-2014

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $18,500,000

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Dale Posgate, Fulcrum Consultants and Geospatial/SALASAN Consulting Inc.

Date: August 2012

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

The evaluation assessed the project's progress towards achieving its planned outcomes, as a whole and for each of its three components, using its logic model as a guide. The approach combined information about performance with judgments on progress and effectiveness.

The evaluation relied on project documents, interviews with key stakeholders and beneficiaries, and a field mission.

Intervention Description

The Afghanistan Community Renewal Program, Phase II, is an $18.5 million program designed to improve the socio-economic position of people and communities in northern and central Afghanistan. The project runs from 2009 to 2014, and focuses on building and strengthening networks of local institutions able to deliver and drive local development processes, supporting public and private actors in the agricultural sector to increase and diversify production, and catalyzing inclusive economic growth through business development services to entrepreneurs and strengthening of key private sector support institutions.

There are three main project components:

Partners and Stakeholders

The project is implemented by the Aga-Khan Foundation Afghanistan. Stakeholders include Community Development Councils and other sub-national entities such as the National Solidarity Programme and the National Area Based Development Programme under the Ministry for Rural Rehabilitation and Development. Civil society organizations and community-based savings groups also receive capacity-building support through the project. Additionally, the project partners with the Department of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock, private sector associations like Chambers of Commerce and the Faculties of Agriculture in Baghlan and Bamyan universities.

Key Conclusions

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations listed above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

Support to the Foundation for Civil Society - 2009-2011

Evaluation Type: Mid-term Assessment

Country: Tanzania

Project Duration: 2007-2013

Maximum DFATD Contribution: $4,605,170

Commissioned by: Canadian International Development Agency (amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) in June 2013)

Consultant: Ecom Research Group

Date: May 2012

Purpose and Approach of the Evaluation

The specific objectives of the evaluation were to establish the impacts of the interventions funded by the Foundation for Civil Society (FCS) in line with its Strategic Plan (2009-2013) and log frame, and to measure the effectiveness of the Foundation interventions relating to the first three key result areas: policy engagement, governance and accountability and civil society capacity strengthening.

The midterm impact assessment assessed the effectiveness and impact of the FCS funded activities of civil society organizations (CSOs) in meeting the intended beneficiaries' needs, the extent to which communities were involved in the activities of the CSOs and the impact on them, and the extent to which citizens have been empowered to realize their rights, engage in policy dialogue and impact on their communities and their lives.

The evaluation relied on desk review of documents and reports, in-depth interviews with key stakeholders, fieldwork visits for data collection and physical verifications/assessments.

Intervention Description

The Foundation for Civil Society is one of the largest support mechanisms for capacity building of civil society in Tanzania. It is an umbrella organization offering grants and training to support the work of CSOs in Tanzania. The FCS is a Tanzanian non-profit organization funded by a group of like-minded donor countries and governed by an independent Board of Directors. To enhance civil society's contribution to poverty reduction, FCS grants aim to improve organizational, financial, technical and managerial capacity of civil society organizations (CSOs); develop a more conducive environment for policy dialogue with the Tanzanian government; encourage and strengthen CSOs networking and, build a positive image of the role of civil society.

FCS provides grants to CSOs engaged in four key areas: policy dialogue with the Government of Tanzania; supporting and advocating for the needs of the vulnerable members of society; strengthening governance and advocacy; and strengthening CSO networks.

Intervention Sectors

Partners and Stakeholders

FCS was the main partner, while civil society organizations receiving grants and support from FCS, Local government authorities at district, ward and village levels, public expenditure tracking committees, and national level ministries were stakeholders and partners.

Key Conclusions

Key Recommendations

The conclusions and recommendations listed above are those of the Consultant and do not necessarily reflect the views of DFATD or the Government of Canada. DFATD does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided in this report.

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